Wednesday, 14 September 2016

September EF Masses in Lancaster Diocese

With apologies for omitting this at the beginning of the month, here is the schedule for the rest of September.

Every Sunday at 6.00 pm
Our Lady & St Joseph, Carlisle

Shrine Church of St Walburge, Preston
Mondays – Fridays: 8.30 am, Low Mass (except First Fridays & Holy Days 7.00 pm)
Saturdays: 10.30 am, Low Mass
Sundays: 10.30 am, Sung Mass


Additionally:

Sunday 25th September at 3.00 pm
Nineteenth Sunday after Pentecost

St Mary's, Hornby

New Assistant Rep for Lancaster LMS

We are pleased to report that John Rogan, who serves Mass for us at Hornby and Sizergh, has agreed to become Assistant Local Representative which will relieve some of our load and allow us to continue as Local Representatives and this has been approved by the LMS Committee.


Bob Latin & John Rogan


John will be responsible for the liturgical side of things - the arrangement of Masses (eg Sizergh), new Mass initiatives, finding priests and servers and checking on the rubrics etc. We will retain responsibility for the administration - liaison with HQ ie making submissions of Mass Listings to HQ & reports to Mass of Ages, sending details of Masses for advertising in the Catholic Voice etc. We will also handle the money side and make financial returns to HQ when required. By dividing the duties this way we will be able to fit the LR role more comfortably into our schedule.

The Burden of Jesus

Upon Jesus rested a frightful weight of decision. Every act, every word, every inner impulse with Him must be, not high, but of the very highest. Everything had to be truth and holiness. Any man would have collapsed under this burden, and even to attempt it would have destroyed him. This is the truly incomprehensible: that Jesus not only bears this burden, but that He bears it naturally, freely. Words are not strong enough to express the marvel of the divine ease under a burden so heavy.




What does the Father's will require of Jesus? That He bring near the kingdom of God, exercise His lordship over the people first called, and through them begin, in this world, the transformation of existence into the “new man”, living under a “new heaven" upon a “new earth". For that to come about, however, the people must turn to Him in faith and love. He brings them the fullness of grace and salvation, but they must be allowed to accept it freely. And this in the face of a history centuries old, filled to overflowing, as the Old Testament shows, with examples of disobedience, apostasy and rebellion, all of which is potentially present in habits of mind and spirit. The people to whom the Messiah came with His Gospel had entrenched themselves in attitudes and ideas which served to
intensify their stubbornness. To proclaim the Gospel meant, then, to unroll the whole meaning of this people’s existence.

He who brings what is completely new, upon which everything turns, calls forth, at the same time, everything old, and draws from it the conclusions of the whole past. This He was called to do with genuine respect for man’s freedom. That freedom must be as genuine as the decision with which man is faced is great. Jesus must proclaim, but not influence; teach, but not recruit; warn, but not alarm; impress, but not compel. He must show neither weakness not passion. He must not protect Himself, give ground, or flee. He penetrates into the depths of men’s souls, knows their every impulse. He has power not only over their thoughts, imaginings and feelings, but direct power over nature as well. This power, in all divine sincerity, He must not use to bend man's will. It is from this point of view that we must try to understand the temptations which offer Him the opportunity of making use of that power in the service of His own will and thereby of spoiling the purity of His redemptive work. Do we have the slightest inkling what such a life must have been? To have brought salvation and endless opportunity to men, and at the same time to have been unable to use the least constraint? To have seen men needy and abandoned, and to have been unable in any way, and for their own good, to persuade or to compel them?




Jesus knows that history, from its very earliest beginnings, has moved toward Him. Now it surges and mounts up about Him. He knows that all the evil of the past has aroused itself and turns against him, drawing the consequences, and He is obliged to give it full sway. He may speak, teach, warn, exercise His goodness, generosity and miraculous power in man's behalf, but only in such a way that neither man’s freedom nor the responsibility for his own acts is impaired. Jesus sees how the decision inclines against Him, and through what people, what miserable acts, what chance happenings! He sees how everything is converging toward a climax, of the frightfulness of which the hour in Gethsemani gives us an intimation - and He may do nothing to avert it. And that not because of any
weakness, indecision or yielding in His nature, but out of the perfection of pure courage and divine responsibility.

Behind this, arrayed against Him, stands the Adversary. Now he will accomplish what he had been unable to achieve through the temptation, namely, induce Jesus to betray His Father’s will, be it from fear or rebellion, from injured pride, or zeal for His mission - or even from compassion for mankind - and if for only the briefest moment, for He who would betray God’s will was no mere man, but the Son of God. Then God would be standing in opposition to Himself and, let us admit what must be admitted - it would have meant the end of God.




In the fact that this did not happen lies Jesus’ triumph. His “battle" is no encounter of power against power, no struggle for supremacy of strength against strength, no concentration of will against an enemy, but something entirely different, something inconceivably great, pure, quiet - namely, endurance in pure truth, actualization of the divine will to the utmost limit, perfect freedom in the fullness of possibilities, generosity and love in absolute perfection.




We have already said that the most frightful thing about sin was that no one had been able to measure its actual power. No one knew of what it might finally be capable, and Satan’s deception - deception of himself who lives by lying - gave the appearance of having the power to divorce God from truth,
and in so doing to dethrone Him whose sovereignty rests upon His worthiness to receive power and glory, honour and adoration. The Adversary had carried out the temptation with every means he could devise, but with the result that Christ proved to be the perfection of obedience and love. Then it became clear that God is not only greater than the powers of nature, not only more powerful than the will of man, but stronger even than sin. That point had been contested, and was now proved. Then was given to God the honour which belongs to Him. Then began that mysterious judgment of which John speaks often, and of which the final judgment at the end of the world will be the revelation.

“The Faith and Modern Man”, Romano Guardini, Chapter 11, The Adversary.





Tuesday, 2 August 2016

New editor for Mass of Ages

The LMS has appointed Tom Quinn as Managing Editor of Mass of Ages magazine. Based in London, Tom comes to his new role with many years’ experience behind him as an editor, photographer and writer. He has worked on magazines covering a variety of subjects, as well as contributing to mainstream newspapers. With this wealth of experience, and being a Catholic who has knowledge and enormous sympathy for traditional practices, he is suitably qualified to build on the very successful work done by Dylan Parry, our outgoing Managing Editor.

Dylan leaves us to test a vocation to the Religious Life. The next edition of Mass of Ages, due out in August, will be his last and we take this opportunity to thank Dylan for his work in making Mass of Ages appeal to an ever-increasing readership and assure him of our prayers.

Joseph Shaw, Chairman of the Latin Mass Society, said, 'The Society is very grateful to Dylan for his work on the magazine, and we assure him of our prayers for his novitiate. We are very fortunate to have found such an experienced and highly skilled replacement in Tom Quinn, and look forward to working with him.'

Wednesday, 6 July 2016

Young Catholic Adults (YCA) weekend 28th-30th October 2016



YCA foster a greater appreciation of orthodox Catholicism and the traditional practices of the Church (Traditional Masses), in an atmosphere of charity and positivity. More details can be found at http://www.youngcatholicadults.co.uk/ or http://youngcatholicadults-latestnews.blogspot.co.uk/.

Booking is now open at:- https://v1.bookwhen.com/yca-douai-2016

It is aimed at 18-40 year olds. There are a couple of events open to all ages, the Sung Mass (and Marian procession afterwards) on Saturday 29th October at 11am in the Parish Church at Douai, and the Sung Mass on Sunday 30th October at 10:30am in the Parish Church at Douai. As things stand both will be in the Dominican Rite.


These are the only EF form Masses held at Douai Abbey, so it would be wonderful to have as many people attending as possible! For further information contact the coordinator, Damian Barker at youngcatholicadult@googlemail.com

Appeal from Lancaster University Catholic Chaplaincy


Following the historic Traditional Mass at Lancaster University Chaplaincy, Fr Philip Conner has emailed us with details of an exciting new project to beautify the chapel, see below.




If you are interested in supporting this venture please contact Fr Philip directly on 01524 594071 or LanCatholic@gmail.com.